German American Names  
 
   
 

1. American Ethnicity, Census 1990, 2000 and 2010

The US Census Bureau says, "Ancestry refers to a person's ethnic origin or descent, 'roots,' or heritage, or the place of birth of the person or the person's parents or ancestors before their arrival in the United States". The US census of 1990 shows that 58 Millions of Americans claiming full or partial German descent:

rank Ancestry group persons %
1 German 57.947.873 23.2%
2 Irish 38.735.509 15.6%
3 English 32.651.788 13.1%
4 African 23.777.098 9.6%
5 Italian 14.664.550 5.9%
 This result did not pleased the authorities and therefore for the Census of the year 2000 the questionnaire changed from “which is your ethnicity” to “ where your ancestors come from”, with this result:

US Census

2000

%

1990

%

W10;

German

42,885,162

15.2%

57,947,873

23.2%

-15,062,711

Irish

30,594,130

10.9%

38,735,539

15.6%

-8,141,409

English

24,515,138

8.7%

32,651,788

13.1%

-8,136,650

Other*

91,609,005

32.6

38,432,663

14.6%

53,176,342

( the two Census compared)

These are officially reported results, this is a Wikipedia opinon:
English American:
"According to American Community Survey in 2009 data, Americans reporting English ancestry made up an estimated 9.0% of the total U.S. population, and form the third largest European ancestry group after German Americans and Irish Americans. However, demographers regard this as an undercount, as the index of inconsistency is high, and many, if not most, people from English stock have a tendency to identify simply as Americans or, if of mixed European ancestry, nominate a more recent and differentiated ethnic group. Throughout the nineteenth century, England was the largest investor in American land development, railroads, mining, cattle ranching, and heavy industry. Perhaps because English settlers gained easy acceptance, they founded few organizations dedicated to preserving the traditions of their homeland. (cited from Wikipedia )

2. German Empire in the 18th Century

In the eighteenth century Germany as a unified, sovereign state was only a vague idea. The Holy Roman Empire provided only a loose framework of more or less independent small states. In an area of 660,000 square kilometers there lived twenty-seven million inhabitants, divided among 310 territories, 50 imperial free cities, and 1,500 imperial knighthoods. Large German provinces such as East Prussia, West Prussia, and Schleswig were situated outside the imperial boundaries. The emperor had no real power. Since 1648 the territories had possessed sovereignty, and looked upon each other as foreign countries. Even a move to a neighboring village lying on the other side of the frontier was considered as emigration. Germany as a Nation exists since 1871

Alsace:

The Alsace lay in the Rhine Valley on the west bank of the Rhine River and east of the Vosges Mountains. These territories had become 921 part of King Louis the German reign, and later became part of the Holy Roman Empire. The population in the Alsace is ethnically German. In Alsace they speak an Alemanic German, asides from French (refer to Switzerland), a dialect similar spoken on the opposite eastern bank of the Rhine. The Alsace was occupied in 1680 by Louis XIV and being torn off the Holy Roman Empire.

Lorraine:

 

The Lorraine section is situated in the upper Moselle valley to the north of the Vosges Mountains.

3. Queen's Anne Germans:

 

The movement of mass emigration from the Palatinate to England began in summer 1709. It is noted of record is found, not in the Palatinate, but in the minutes of the British Board of Trade in London. This minute is a communication from the Lords of Trade to the Queen, setting forth that certain "-.distressed Palatines, who had been driven out of the Palatinate by the cruelties of the French, "forty in number, with one Joshua Kockerthal, a Lutheran minister, for their leader, had made application to the Board for transportation to America". Shorty after fourteen others were added, and it would appear that the entire fifty-four constituted a pioneer band, on whose fortune and report depended the action of thousands of their country man.
The Queen and the council were pleased to receive the petition graciously, and order was taken both to relieve the necessities of the poor people, and to send them to New York in the same ship that carried Lord Lovelace to the government of that Province; the new Governor being charged by the Queen to do al in his power "for the comfort of the poor Palatines". Arriving in New York in late summer of 1708, the Palatines, the composition of whose number had been very wisely chosen, as to the ability   and trades, for the founding of a new settlement, were planted sixty miles up the Hudson, at the place where the Quassaic , now Chambers, creek empties into that river. This is the site of the present city of Newburgh, to which it may be supposed, in the absence of contrary proof, that the family name reigning house of the Palatinate furnished the name. Here were given to the Palatines 2000 acre of land, and the community by patent from Governor Hunter was erected into the Palatine Parish of Quassaic. There is here no space to recount their fortunes, save that to the next 30 years, being crowded by English and Scottish settlers, and thinking that more fertile lands were to found in Pennsylvania, a large number sold their holdings on the Hudson, and joined their countrymen in the Province of Penn.
Kockerthal, having settled this pioneer band at Newburgh, returned once to the old country, that he might report as to their favorable fortunes and the gracious disposition of the English government, and might organize a much larger emigration of the people on the Rhine. The success of his efforts was very soon made evident to the astonished English government and the people of London. The roads leading northward from the Palatinate swarmed with the moving multitudes. Thousands of them arrested their journey to Holland, and there settled to add their numbers and virtues to those of that sturdy little republic. Other thousands crowded across the channel and flocked in upon London like an invading horde, in effect saying to the English people: „Here we are. What are you going to do with us"? It was a most embarrassing question, which, be it said, received an answer not less noble, than in our times we have seen given by Christian philanthropy to the cries of starving Ireland and slaughtered Armenia.

This emigration began in the early spring of 1709, and before the end of April about 5000 reached London. Each month of the following summer brought additions to their number, until October the aggregate had amounted to no less than fifteen thousand. The incoming of this large number of people was to the London of that day a most serious matter.

From: Rev. Sanford H. Cobb, Albany N.Y, 1897, a Brief statement of the   
more important Facts contained in a much larger Manuscript,
entitled “The Story of the Palatines

 

4. The ships, which transported these immigrants to America:

The Ships:

Lyon of Keith

Frigate

06/30/1710

Alexander Stevenson

London-New York

Herbert

Frigate

06/30/1710

 

London-New York

Fame

Ship

07/01/1710

Walter Houxton

London-New York

 

 

 

Bartholomew

 

Baltimore

Ship

07/01/1710

Whitehorne

London-New York

Tower

Frigate

07/04/1710

Edward Bennett

London-New York

Hartwell

Ship

07/01/1710

Jeremiah Turner

London-New York

James & Elizabeth

Ship

07/04/1710

Henry Garvener

London-New York

Unknown ship

Ship

07/04/1710

 

London-New York

Lord Lovelace's ship

Frigate

07/04/1710

 

London-New York

 

 

 

 

 

5. The Salzburger

 

On 31 October 1731, the 114th anniversary of Martin Luther's nailing of his 95 Theses to the Wittenberg School door, Roman Catholic Archbishop Count Leopold Anton von Firmian signed an Edict of Expulsion, the "Emigrationspatent", directing all Protestants to recant their non-Catholic beliefs or be banished from the city. (This is not to be confused with many similar edicts of expulsion issued against the Jews in various cities in Europe.)

Landowners were given two days to sell their lands and leave. Cattle, sheep, furniture and land all had to be dumped on the market, and the Salzburgers received little money from the well-to-do Catholic allies of von Firmian. Von Firmian confiscated much of their land for his own family, and ordered all Protestant books and Bibles burned. Many children aged 12 and under were seized to be raised as Roman Catholics. But those who owned land benefited from one key advantage: the three-month deadline delayed their departure until after the worst of winter.

Tenant farmers, tradesmen, laborers and miners were given only eight days to sell what they could and leave. The first refugees marched north in desperately cold temperatures and snow storms, seeking shelter in the few cities of Germany controlled by Protestant princes. Their children walked or rode on wooden wagons loaded with baggage. As they travelled, the exiles' savings were quickly drained. They were set upon by highwaymen, who seized taxes, tolls and payment for protection by soldiers from robbers. The story of their plight spread quickly as their columns marched north. Goethe wrote the poem "Hermann and Dorothea", which though depicting disruptions caused in the aftermath of the French Revolution, was prompted by the story of the Salzburg exiles' march. Protestants and some Catholics were horrified at the cruelty of their expulsion in winter and the courage they had shown by not renouncing their faith. Slowly at first, the refugees arrived at towns that welcomed them and offered them aid. But there was no place where so many refugees could settle.
On 12 March 1734 on board of the ship Purrysbury under Captain Tobias Fire, a small group of about sixty exiles from Salzburg, who had travelled to London first, arrived in the British North American colony of Georgia seeking religious freedom. A Salzburger transport was not a ship, but a traveling party on board of a ship which carried possibly other immigrants.

Later in that year, they were joined by a second group, and, by 1741, a total of approximately 150 of the Salzburg exiles had founded the town of Ebenezer on the Savannah River (see John A. Treutlen)

 

Salzburger ships:

Purrysburg

Ship

12/3/1734

Thomas Fry

Germany -

Georgia

Prince of Wales

Ship

24/12/1734

George Dumbar

Germany -

Georgia

Two Brothers

Ship

6/4/1735

William Thomson

Germany -

Georgia

James

Ship

1/8/1735

John Yoakley

Germany -

Georgia

Georgia

Pink

27/11/1735

NN Daubaz

Germany -

Georgia

Simonds

Ship

17/2/1736

Joseph Cornish

Germany -

Georgia

London Merchant

Ship

17/2/1736

John Thomas

Germany -

Georgia

Three Sisters

Ship

20/12/1737

NN Hewitt

Germany -

Georgia

Two Brothers

Ship

7/10/1738

William Thomson

Germany -

Georgia

Charles

Ship

27/6/1739

NN Haeramond

Germany -

Georgia

Loyal Judith

Ship

2/12/1741

John Lemam

Germany -

Georgia

Europa

Ship

4/12/1741

John Wadham

Germany -

Georgia

Judith

Ship

22/1/1746

Walter Quarme

Germany -

Georgia

Charles Town

Galley

2/10/1749

Peter Bogg

Germany -

Georgia

Charming Martha

Ship

29/10/1750

Chas Leslie

Germany -

Georgia

Antelope

Ship

23/10/1751

John McCelland

Germany -

Georgia

Old Berry

Ship

27/11/1752

Henry Brown

Germany -

Georgia